The Braeswood Tapestry by Robyn Carr

26 Aug

I was hesitant to read Robyn Carr for years. I thought she only wrote one series- the Virgin River series, and I was not too keen on getting immersed on a series with so many items. What I did not realize is that she writes beyond those romances, which is how I got my hands on The Braeswood Tapestry.  On my Nook, I always look for free books, and I always have a tendency to luck out and find a few good books to try. (for those with nooks, I highly recommend the Free Friday selection and just perusing the free items) I saw this Robyn Carr, and it was free, so I downloaded it.

I had no idea what to expect out of this book, but considering the cover, I was expecting a novel with a bit of Chaucer/Beowulf (the fight scenes…. obviously) and Mel Brooks’ Men in Tights (Romance… obviously). Don’t ask me how I created this idea in my head after reading the blurb, but I did.

The Braeswood Tapestry truly has very little to do with a tapestry. I just wanted to get that out there. What the novel is really based around is Jocelyn, a strong, determined, intelligent woman in the 1660s who take her and her families life into her own hands. Her father despises her because she is strong willed, and essentially banishes her when she tried to care for her brother, who is held captive by an evil lord.

She approaches the lords enemy, a returning lord with a mission; he wants to destroy the family who murdered his family, reclaim his wealth, and become a force in society. She uses him to free her brother, and he uses her a mistress. Not exactly a fair trade but whatever.  They both become more than just a physical partners, but with all the trials and tribulations associated with the hierarchy of that time, they both resist. Beyond their relationship, both struggle with issues that have put them beyond their comfort zone. Jocelyn attempts to adapt to a new life – completely different than her life as a farmers daughter. Trent needs to battle his own demons, and learn to find himself.

I suppose this could be considered a romance, but while reading this, it was more of a historical novel. The novel opens with the history of England at that time, the royalty and the wars that plagued the country. It was an interesting novel, and I think that walking into the sorry with no preconceived notions help (minus imaging Mel Brooks driving a cart around.)

As I said earlier, Robyn Carr is widely known for the Virgin River series, but she has written other books, there may be something that catches your interest, so check out her website!

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